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transformer Simon Furman

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    The name or term "Simon" refers to more than one character or idea. For a list of other meanings, see Simon (disambiguation). “ Who can I kill? ” —Simon Furman's first question upon being brought on to write for Beast Wars[1] But... but Swoop is neither vast nor predatory nor even a bird! What is he playing at?Comic book writer Simon Christopher Francis Furman (born March 22, 1961 [2]) is probably the most well-known of all Transformers comics scribes, and certainly the most prolific. He wrote most of the UK-original comic stories of Generation 1, as well as the latter 1/3rd of the US comic run, and has been author on innumerable Transformers tales since. As a result, he is often the first, last, and occasionally only resort in penning Transformers literature, with a deep involvement in a wide variety of product. He's admitted this has left him typecast and his non-Transformers work gets overlooked, but he's stated he stopped struggling against the association years ago and gives thanks for the opportunities and steady income it's given him.[3]He has also written and created many non-Transformers characters, including Death's Head, "Dragon's Claws", and "To the Death" with Geoff Senior and "Brute Force" with José Delbo. He was an editor at Titan Books, which published collections of Transformers comics among other material, and at Tokyopop he 'localised' a translation of a sci-fi gothic romance manga. We're not joking.[4] He was good at it too. [5]In his spare time, Furman enjoys drinking Corona and killing off hordes of background characters. And Nightbeat. He's also a fan of West Ham United football club,[6] which perhaps explains his bloodlust.Contents1 Work on Transformers2 Alternate mode3 Fiction3.1 Dreamwave Armada comic3.2 Titan movie comics3.2.1 Ask Vector Prime3.3 Classics4 Female Transformers5 Comic bibliography5.1 Marvel Comics5.2 Dreamwave Productions5.3 Panini Comics5.4 IDW Publishing5.5 Titan Magazines/Titan Comics5.6 Madman Entertainment5.7 Million Publishing/Henkei! Henkei!6 Bibliography6.1 DK Publishing6.2 Titan Books7 Convention appearances8 Notes9 See also10 References11 External links Work on TransformersThe Simon Furman of early 1985, when I was first asked to write for the UK Transformers comic, would have probably said "pull the other one" if you'd told me I'd still be involved with Transformers more than thirty years laterFurman talking to Vice[7]A list of all of the issues written by Furman's hand would be overkill; even the list of titles he's worked on is considerable: Marvel UK's The Transformers: Furman began his involvement with Transformers as editor and author for much of the Marvel UK run, writing stories that integrated with those coming from Marvel US. Marvel US's The Transformers: At writer Bob Budiansky's recommendation, Furman took over the US book after Budiansky left, writing issues #56-80. The Transformers: Generation 2: Furman penned the entire 12-issue run. Beast Wars cartoon: Furman scripted the final episode of the show, "Nemesis Part 2". 3H Productions: Furman wrote a series of BotCon-exclusive stories, including several live-action voice actor scripts, the Beast Wars comic "Ground Zero" (the very first BotCon story), and the Beast Wars text and comic story "Reaching the Omega Point". Titan Books: while working for them, he pitched the idea of collecting the Marvel Transformers comics into trades, and edited the collections. Titan ended up collecting almost everything Marvel US and UK had ever done, including being able to get the issues with Marvel characters quite cheaply, and got the rights for global licensing: at this point, pre-Dreamwave, neither Marvel nor Hasbro had much investment in Transformers! [8] When the live-action film series was announced, Titan decided to do a tie-in and Furman went on to write almost every issue of the first two volumes, plus a spin-off Animated issue, for 43 issues in total as of April 2012. Dreamwave Productions: Furman wrote two-and-a-half War Within G1 mini-series for Dreamwave, as well as most of their Armada and Energon comics. Transformers: The Ultimate Guide, a book giving an overview of the length and breath of Transformers (toys and fiction) as it existed at the time. The book was arguably somewhat biased towards comic canon (particularly that which he penned) and, in places, invented new material wholecloth without any precedent in prior fiction. As the Dreamwave Generation One continuity was in full swing at the time Furman tended to treat it as the baseline for many of the entries and new material presented here. Micellaneous work in the 2000s would include "Alignment" for the Transforce UK convention, several tie-in comics, Panini's short-lived Armada, and three different mangas. IDW Publishing: He wrote the first five Generation 1 mini-series for IDW's G1 reboot, as well as numerous Spotlight issues. His IDW run is notable for being the only instance where he has actually created the mythos from the ground up, rather than coming in after someone else had already set everything up. Other IDW titles include two Beast Wars mini-series and a Beast Wars guide book, various comics related to the film series, and the belated "completion" of his Marvel (US) G1 run as Regeneration One. Transformers: Earth Wars: Just when he'd got out, in 2015-16 he was pulled back in by Hasbro to write the story for the Earth Wars mobile game. This was his first video game work and he said he enjoyed it as it involved "flexing new creative muscles".[9] Transformers: The Definitive G1 Collection: Late 2016 saw Hatchette hire our man to edit their sixty-volume partwork collecting every Generation 1 comic ever made.He almost drifted into Transformers, being asked early on to pitch some ideas and quickly becoming the Transformers guy at Marvel UK, also doing the editorials and letters pages until 1989 when he went with just the scripts. His post-Marvel return to Transformers came courtesy of BotCon 1997: not only was he a guest expected to answer questions he couldn't remember the answers to, there was this thing called a "Beast Wars" they wanted him to write a short comic about. He quickly had to get back into the swing of things. After the Botcon material, he'd work for Titan Books and then go onto Dreamwave, causing him to be linked forever more with the franchise.Contrary to the popular opinion that he is an outspoken critic of the Generation 1 cartoon series, Furman has stated in an interview that he loves the series. He explained that when he was involved with the Marvel comic books as a twenty-something-year-old writer, he thought the show was pitched a little young and that the stories were simplistic and had huge logic flaws, but conceded that he saw them from a different perspective than the generation that grew up watching the cartoon and buying the toys as kids, and so he concentrated on his work, which he believed was more "adult" in tone. He added that, in hindsight, he went back to watch the series and now really enjoys it, particularly Season 2's strong character stories. When he wrote for Marvel comics, he was averse to episodes that dealt with the character back-stories because they clashed with his own back-stories and also caused him to worry that he wasn't presenting the characters as intended. But now he had the freedom to take the series as a viewer and admire the way they were building upon their own mythos.In the same interview, he thought the 1986 animated movie was "fantastic", and one of his stated reasons was that "characters died."[10]In terms of other Transformers media, he's a big fan of Transformers Animated, saying it's the best cartoon since Beast Wars,[11] despite a relative lack of violent deaths. While he liked Wars, he stated in an interview that he considers Beast Machines to be too dark for a children's cartoon.[12] He's not a fan of the movies either, believing they throw out characterisation and story, though he happily admits he's not the audience for them. He still admires the technical side of the films and Michael Bay's vision.[13] Alternate modeWhen Furman became the editor of the UK Transformers comic, it opened up a dilemma, as Marvel policy, enforced by Marvel US editor-in-chief Tom DeFalco, frowned on editors serving as their own writers. To circumvent this problem, it was agreed that senior editor (and frequent Transformers letterer) Richard Starkings would serve in an advisory capacity on Furman's own strips.[14]When an editorial credit for the comic as a whole was required, Furman used the credit "Chris Francis", derived from his middle names.[15] Fiction Dreamwave Armada comicThe flesh creature known as Simon Furman pleased Unicron with his accurate depiction of Unicron's omnipotent magnificence. Letters page for "The End" Titan movie comicsAccording to Starscream, Furman was a Maximal disguised as a "strategically shaved ape. Especially on his head." #7's Star Screams When Starscream captured the Titan offices, only Furman escaped capture and was still at large, with a vast amount of intelligence regarding nucleon. #21's Star ScreamsThe Autobots, however, were not much nicer. When Furman was writing his alternate universe tale, Ironhide "made sure" that it would have an Autobot-friendly ending... #12's Law and Disorder Ask Vector PrimeSimon Furman was a Maximal because they had a better dental plan than the Predacons. Ask Vector Prime, 16/6/2015 He was identified as a wielder of the Quill, which allowed him to evade death. Vector Prime identified him as the one who had charted many of their destinies, which raises a lot of strange metafictional questions. Ask Vector Prime, 10/8/2015 ClassicsWhen an alternate Ultra Magnus threatened to destroy Earth with the power of his Terminus Blade, Simon Furman was stuck in a collapsing building in Canada. Invasion Female TransformersSimon Furman has traditionally not been a fan of Female Transformers or the idea of gendering Transformers at all, stating on several occasions that he doesn't understand why robots would have women.[16] Subsequently he's attempted to explain it in Marvel UK (which inherited Arcee from the 1986 film) and at IDW, but both stories have been pretty awkward. "Prime's Rib!" for Marvel said she was built after a feminist mob had protested about a lack of female Cybertronians, while Arcee's IDW origin in the IDW continuity attempted "to apply a rationale to the whole issue"[17] by saying Jhiaxus had introduced gender to the race. That was unfortunately shown by having Arcee as a genderless Cybertronian that was forcibly changed into a female gendered form, traumatizing her. His insistence that Cybertronians are genderless, not male by default, extended to a post he wrote[18] in response to a blog post by Mairghread Scott discussing other female Transformers in IDW, wherein she stated that she understood that Arcee's origin could be seen as offensive to women, especially those who are transgender. The two authors later talked in private and settled the beef. Outside of the origins, Furman's female 'bots are written the same as their male counterparts.In 2016, during an interview with Vice, Furman said they "almost certainly" "could/should" have done better with female Transformers in the 1980s but views it as a different time and audience and that he doubted he'd do it differently now. When it came to the recent work, he said he applauded what had been done "and done well" with female characters. [19] Comic bibliography Marvel Comics Marvel UK #13–21, 29–32, 45–50, 59–65, 74–88, 96–104, 113–120, 125, 130–138, 146–153, 160–161, 164–173, 182–189, 198–205, 213–332 Marvel US #56–80 Generation 2 #1–12 Dreamwave Productions The War Within vol.1 #1–6, vol.2 #1–6, vol.3 #1–3 (#4–6 unreleased) Armada #6–18 Energon #19–30 (#31–36 unreleased) "Perspective", from the 20th Anniversary Transformers Summer Special Panini Comics Armada #1–9 IDW Publishing Infiltration #0–6 Spotlight #1–6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15 (story by Klaus Scherwinski), 16–19 (Revelation), unrevealed Spotlight (status unknown) Stormbringer #1–4 Escalation #1–6 Devastation #1–6 Revelation #1–4 Maximum Dinobots #1–5 The Gathering #1–4 The Ascending #1–4 Transformers: Movie Prequel #1–4 (with Chris Ryall) Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen comic book adaptation All Hail Megatron #13 ("Old Ways") Tales of the Fallen #2, #4, #5 Nefarious #1–6 The Transformers: Regeneration One #80.5-100 Titan Magazines/Titan Comics Transformers Comic v1 #1–25Transformers Comic v2 #1-9, #11-14 & #18-21. Transformers Animated #1 Madman Entertainment The Transformers Million Publishing/Henkei! Henkei! "Starscream's New Body" Bibliography DK PublishingTransformers: The Ultimate GuideTransformers: The Movie GuideYou Can Draw TransformersTransformers: The Movie Universe Titan BooksTransformers: The Art of the Movies (canceled) Convention appearancesBotCon 1997BotCon 1998BotCon 2001BotCon 2002OTFCC 2003OTFCC 2004BotCon 2006BotCon 2008BotCon 2012San Diego Comic-Con 2009C.O.N.S. (2011)C.O.N.S. (2012)NordCon 2010TFcon 2011Auto Assembly 2003Auto Assembly 2004Auto Assembly 2005Auto Assembly 2006Auto Assembly 2008Auto Assembly 2010Auto Assembly 2011Auto Assembly Europe 2011 Notes Transformers was the earliest comic he wrote after leaving IPC's Scream!. Outside of Transformers, he's worked on multiple comic strips in the 80s to 10s. His most prolific time was 1980s Marvel UK, where he not only wrote Transformers but also strips for Action Force and Doctor Who Magazine, and created Dragons Claws and Death's Head (both netting ten issues, plus a graphic novel for DH). Outside of comics, he's written for a few cartoons, was involved in Rik Alvarez's first stab at an independent toyline[20], and in 2012-2015 was the head writer and script supervisor for UK/Canadian co-production Matt Hatter Chronicles. He and Andrew Wildman created an IP company, Wildfur, in the early 00s to try and sell new ideas they'd come up with[21] but that quietly died; he and Senior brought out a webcomic, To The Death, in late 2016 (which harkened back to both Claws and Death's Head) but the Kickstarter for the prequel graphic novel only made half its needed amount.[22] It is generally accepted that Grimlock is Furman's signature Transformers character, although a case could be made for Nightbeat. His signature creation (according to the man himself [23]) is the bounty hunter freelance peacekeeping agent Death's Head, yes?. He spent at least some time as the writer of the Marvel UK comics letters page, setting the precedent for having a Transformer "host" reply to the kids' letters, but without patronising them. This tradition has been followed up on in other UK comics. Chris Claremont, X-Men mega-writer, is one of Furman's key influences in comics: "Mostly how well he managed multiple characters and sub-plots, something I’ve applied to my Transformers work as much as I can ever since". Other influences are Alan Moore's Marvel UK work; 70s/80s sci-fi films like Blade Runner, Aliens, and Terminator, as well as Assault On Precinct 13; and crime books.[24] If his last words before dying aren't "hnng... never did want to live forever", there will be much sadness. Apparently, if Pat Lee wants back in Transformers, he will have to climb over Simon's cold, rotting corpse to do it.[25] Simon Furman wrote a script for the Auto Assembly 2009 script reading making fun of himself and Furmanisms. He was also present for Auto Assembly 2010 where he provided a Beast Wars related script. Furmanite and Simfur are obvious enough puns on his name. Due to the impact of Marvel UK's Transformers on a generation of comic, House to Astonish only half-joked that Furman was the underrated influential writer of his generation.[26] Known pros who grew up on his work include James Roberts, Simon Williams, John-Paul Bove, and Kieron Gillen. See also Furmanism 80% of this Wiki. References↑ BotCon 2002 appearance↑ Interview at Ben Yee's website↑ Interview at Mindless Ones blog↑ Austin Texas Library entry for DOLL Volume 1↑ Sunday Comics: Tokyopop's Bubble Bursts: "Mihara’s other Gothic works were a popular mainstay of Tokyopop’s Manga line, thanks to Simon Furman’s translation, who was a writer for Transformers. He gave the disassociated vibe of those protagonists such a realistic feel"↑ Interview on Transfans.co.uk↑ Vice interview on Earth Wars↑ Moonbase 2 AA2010 interview, 7:50 -↑ Vice interview on Earth Wars: "Usually, storytelling for me is a one-off process, after which it moves on to another level—with the artist, or whatever. But this was much more a case of laying out a rough story framework and then evolving and adapting it to fit the game mechanics, and it was a much more collaborative, team process. I always enjoy flexing new creative muscles, and this was very much that. We tried hard, within what could be a fairly restrictive storytelling medium, to give Earth Wars the kind of narrative integrity that owed more to my comics work. Overall, I think we succeeded."↑ Simon Furman's interview on Madman Entertainment's Beast Wars Season 3 DVD set↑ July 4, 2008 blog post↑ "The Last 'Action' Hero"↑ Interview at Mindless Ones blog↑ Starkings, Richard "Prophetic Words" in Transformers: Dark Designs trade paperback (London; Titan Books, 2002), page 4.↑ Unknown author "Transformers UK" in Second Generation Trade paperback (London; Titan Books, 2004), page 6.↑ "Arcee-a-Go-Go": "Well, I’ve always been fairly outspoken about the redundancy of ‘female’ Transformers (or ‘fembots’). It’s not a sexist thing, it’s just that they’re robots."↑ "Arcee-a-Go-Go"↑ http://simonfurman.wordpress.com/2013/12/29/response-to-mairghread-scott/↑ Vice interview on Earth Wars↑ TFformers article on Furman's involvement↑ http://www.wildfur.net/↑ Kickstarter: "To The Death: A Graphic Novel by Simon Furman & Geoff Senior"↑ http://forum.idwpublishing.com/viewtopic.php?p=42871↑ Interview with Transformers Hispanos Forums↑ Based upon a comment Furman made at BotCon 2008 when asked if Pat Lee would ever work for IDW Publishing↑ H2A: "Holds to Astonish: Mike Quackenbrush" External links Simon Furman on Twitter Simon Furman's blog To The Death homepage Homepage of Wildfur Productions, original properties by Andrew Wildman and Simon Furman. Simon Furman on the Internet Movie DatabaseRetrieved from "http://tfwiki.net/mediawiki/index.php?title=Simon_Furman&oldid=1159968" Categories: Armada humansClassics humansConvention guestsDreamwave ProductionsEditorsHall of Fame creatorsIDW PublishingMainframe EntertainmentMarvel ComicsMaximalsMovie TransformersReal peopleRevenge of the Fallen TransformersTitanWriters
     

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